Trump Brings Up War of 1812 in Tense Call to Trudeau

After announcing on new tariffs on Canada's steel and aluminum imports to the US, president Trump brought up the war of 1812, saying the Canadians burned down the White House.

In the footsteps of the new tariffs Trump wants to invoke on aluminum and steel imports from Canada, he and Canada's Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, spoke on the phone to resolve the matter. Trump had previously called the American neighbor from the north "unfair" in regards to the Canada's trade policies, also calling its dairy policy a "disgrace". In a recent call between the two leaders, Trump also brought up a two-century war when he spoke to Trudeau about the impending tariffs.

Trump talks about war of 1812 in tariff call to Trudeau
Source: gettyimages

Last month Trump and Trudeau spoke on the phone, and reportedly Trudeau asked the US president how he could justify the new taxes by claiming that they are instilled for security reasons, to which Trump replied “Didn’t you guys burn down the White House?” according to CNN.

White House reps did not comment on Trump's remark, which is historically inaccurate. In reality, it was British troops who burned the White House in 1814 as part of their attempt to invade the US from its mid-Atlantic region. The British attempt to take over Baltimore eventually failed as they lost the battle of Fort McHenry. Canada was also a part of the war that came to be known as the War of 1812.

Trump talks about war of 1812 in tariff call to Trudeau
Source: gettyimages

Trump's comment to Trudeau came in the heels of his unilateral announcement about the tariffs that was not granted congressional approval. Canadians were up in arms following Trump's decision, and in a recent interview for NBC on Sunday, Trudeau had this to say:

“One of the things that I have to admit I’m having a lot of trouble getting around is the idea that this entire thing is coming about because the president and the administration have decided that Canada and Canadian steel and aluminum is a national security threat to the United States. Our soldiers had fought and died together on the beaches of world war two and the mountains of Afghanistan and have stood shoulder to shoulder in some of the most difficult places in the world, that are always there for each other, somehow – this is insulting to that,” said Trudeau. “The idea that the Canadian steel that’s in military vehicles in the United States, the Canadian aluminum that makes your fighter jets is somehow now a threat.”

Trump is scheduled to attend the G7 summit in Quebec, and will travel to Canada this coming Friday.